Farro Soup

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Okay, okay, okay! I really am going to try to start blogging again. And to prove that, I’m sharing a recipe that isn’t even made for a food blog monthly roundup (though I am going to be linking it places.)

I don’t really know why I’m making soup in the summer in the desert, but it worked out that it was cooler tonight than it has been.

I don’t have much to say – except that this recipe was good. I served it with these rosemary breadsticks.

Farro Soup
(original source)

Ingredients
3/4 cup farro, uncooked
3 pieces pepper bacon
1/4 cup onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp rosemary, minced
8 cup chicken broth
1 cup grape tomatoes, diced

Directions

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the uncooked farro. Cook for 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  2. Chop the bacon into pieces. Heat a Dutch oven over medium-heat. Cook the bacon until the bacon is cooked all the way through.
  3. Add the onion, garlic, and rosemary and saute with the bacon for 2 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken broth and the tomatoes into the Dutch oven. Bring to a boil.
  5. Once the soup is boiling, add the farro. Cover with a lid and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 15 minutes.

 

I’m also going to post this here, based on the comment of the original source of the recipe I was inspired by:

“Copyright law does not protect recipes that are mere listings of ingredients. Nor does it protect other mere listings of ingredients such as those found in formulas, compounds, or prescriptions. Copyright protection may, however, extend to substantial literary expression—a description, explanation, or illustration, for example—that accompanies a recipe or formula or to a combination of recipes, as in a cookbook.”
http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl122.html

Federal Courts have also ruled that even certain recipes in cookbooks are not protected by copyright:

“The DISCOVER DANNON recipes’ directions for preparing the assorted dishes fall squarely within the class of subject matter specifically  [481] excluded from copyright protection by 17 U.S.C. § 102(b). Webster’s defines a recipe as:

a set of instructions for making something . . . a formula for cooking or preparing something to be eaten or drunk: a list of ingredients and a statement of the procedure to be followed in making an item of food or drink . . . a method of procedure for doing or attaining something.

WEBSTER’S THIRD NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 1895 (Merriam-Webster 1986). The recipes at issue here describe a procedure by which the reader may produce many dishes featuring Dannon yogurt. As such, they are excluded from copyright protection as either a “procedure, process, [or] system.” 17 U.S.C. § 102(b).

Meredith fashioned processes for producing appetizers, salads, entrees, and desserts. Although the inventions of “Swiss ‘n’ Cheddar Cheeseballs” and “Mediterranean Meatball Salad” were at some time original, here can be no monopoly in the copyright sense in the ideas for producing certain foodstuffs. Nor can there be copyright in the method one might use in preparing and combining the necessary ingredients. Protection for ideas or processes is the purview of patent. The order and manner in which Meredith presents the recipes are part and parcel of the copyright in the compilation, but that is as far as it goes.”

(Publ’ns Int’L, Ltd. v. Meredith Corp. (1996) 88 F.3d 473)

 

never copy and paste recipes verbatim that I find online or in cookbooks. I never steal the creative commentary that would be copyright protected.

I post the original source of the recipes I follow as a nod and a thank you to the blog where I found the recipe. I can either continue to post as I do, or I can stop posting the links to where I found the recipe. But no offense, there’s nothing particularly creative about Italian Farro Soup, especially when the blogger I linked admits to having taken the recipe from an unsourced magazine.

I’m sorry I find this very annoying. And while I generally do not rant in my blog, I will not remove the recipe list but I will remove the blog link if ever so necessary.

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